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Roasted Beets

Roasted Beets
It couldn't be easier to roast beets to add to a salad or serve as a side dish.
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. Beets, scrubbed and trimmed of leaves and root tips
  2. Olive oil
  3. Balsamic vinegar (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. You want your beets to be fairly uniform in size so they cook at the same rate, so you may need to cut large beets in half.
  3. Spread out a 12-inch square of aluminum foil and place the beets in the center. Drizzle lightly with the olive oil and rub it over the beets to coat.
  4. Wrap all the beets up tightly in the square of aluminum foil, folding the edges to seal, then place the bundle of beets into a baking pan. Many recipes call for each beet to be individually wrapped in foil, but I've never seen any advantage to that more labor-intensive method.
  5. Place in the oven and cook until tender. Small beets like the ones shown in this photo will require less cooking time, so you could check them after 25 or 30 minutes, while medium to large beets will require 40 to 50 minutes in the oven.
  6. Remove the beets from the oven and open the aluminum foil pouch to let the heat escape. After the beets are cool enough to handle—at least ten minutes—you can slip the skin from them easily, then slice or chunk them as desired. Baby beets can be left whole or cut in half.
  7. I like to placed my cooked beets in a glass bowl (something that won't stain) and sprinkle them with a bit of balsamic vinegar before I eat them in a salad or as a side dish. They'll keep well in the fridge for a few days.
Notes
  1. One thing to remember when eating beets is that all but the golden varieties are full of vibrantly red natural dye. A gentle warning: this dye keeps its color as it travels through your digestive tract, so keep that in mind and do not be alarmed by any—ahem—changes over the next day or two. 'Nuff said? If you find this troubling I'd recommend sticking to golden beets.
  2. (Originally published June 9, 2013)
MO Deep Roots http://www.modeeproots.com/

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